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NEW EBOOK
Now available as an e-book, Navigating Home is an insightful and moving view inside the dreams, histories and talents of this remarkable collection of artists. By Amy Bowring

Hari Krishnan

HARI KRISHNAN
Visit our Pages in History section to learn about some of the individuals whose legacies we preserve.

Hari Krishnan

REHEARSAL WITH DAVID EARLE
DCD's Youtube channel has a wide and ever-growing collection of videos. Drop by to watch the latest uploads!

MagPreview

DCD MAGAZINE
Drop by ShopDCD to get a copy of our annual magazine. Sign up to our e-list and gain free access to all back issues.

FEATURED THIS WEEK!

MAUD ALLAN - AN EDWARDIAN SENSATION
A NEW EXHIBITION FEATURING ONE OF DANCE HISTORY'S MOST PROVOCATIVE PERSONALITIES

Maud Allan Head

Maud Allan’s story reads like a modern-day tabloid … filled with libel suits, murder and tempestuous love affairs. At the height of her career, Maud was a dance sensation in Edwardian London where she was the face of collectors’ items ranging from cigarette silks to coffee tins. She was a contemporary of the forerunners of modern dance: Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan and Ruth St. Denis, but is the least known of this group of revolutionary dance artists. She attained international stardom through her tasteful “dance interpretations”, which she cleverly contrasted with the daring costume she wore in her chef d’œuvre The Vision of Salomé. Women adorned their clothing with beads to imitate the spectacular garment, and newspapers praised the famed “Salomé dancer” for her grace and elegance. As with any public infatuation, however, her success was short-lived. Within two years of her sensational 1908 London debut, Maud’s career began to crumble and she experienced the humiliating fall from international acclaim into obscurity

Like those in the Edwardian Era, I found myself captivated and inspired by the extraordinary Salomé costume. The intricacy of its beadwork and overall beauty as a garment helped shape the exhibit in terms of its colours and design, while its history and symbolism acted as a blueprint for the content.

Today, as a century-old artifact, the textile’s importance is apparent. The costume’s significance to Canadian dance history was recognized by the Canadian Conservation Institute in its willingness to accept the garment for conservation treatment.

Acknowledgement of the costume as a significant Canadian artifact affirms DCD’s place within Canada’s cultural heritage and reiterates the importance of preserving and sharing these dance legacies on both a national and global level.

Through this virtual exhibit, we hope that you will join DCD in celebrating the life and career of this astonishing Canadian dancer whose story has been all but forgotten. - Katelyn Roughley, Exhibit Curator

DCD HALL OF FAME

DCD Hall of Fame

POSTPONED

Dance Collection Danse has made the difficult decision to postpone the 2020 DCD Hall of Fame. We also canceled planned workshops and an inductee panel. We joined other organizations in our civic duty to help slow the spread of COVID-19. We will celebrate the same wonderful group of inductees in March 2021. (MORE)

SHOP DCD FACELIFT!

Workshops and Panel

RESPONSIVE & MORE SECURE!

Just in time time for the release of our latest book, Amy Bowring's Navigating Home: Artists of the NL Dance Project, we have redesigned out store to be more secure and work seamlessly on mobile devices. Drop by and see how it looks... maybe even buy something? MORE

WHAT IS NEXT?

Rick Mercer

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU

Elements of Canada's dance history exist in numerous collections across the country and we want to: A) Know what's out there; and B) Share everything digitally. How? We have several ideas but we want your input. VISIT HERE to add your story. It only takes a few minutes and your input will help shape what we invest in next.

CONTACT

1303 - 2 Carlton St.
Toronto, ON
M5B 1J3
Canada
Phone: 416-365-3233
1-800-665-5320
(toll free in Canada)
Fax: 416-365-3169
talk@dcd.ca

Research Centre
Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Appointment Required
Contact Amy Bowring by email or call one of the numbers above

PERSONNEL

Miriam Adams, C.M.
Co-founder/Advisor

Amy Bowring
Executive and Curatorial Director

Jay Rankin
Administrative Director

Vickie Fagan
Director of Development and Producer/Hall of Fame

Michael Ripley
Marketing & Sales Coordinator

Beth Dobson
Metcalf Foundation Performing Arts Intern

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